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Surfin on Life // Jzas Wlks via mookimooks.com

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Harriet Quimby (May 11, 1875 – July 1, 1912)
She was the second woman in the world to receive a pilot’s license and the first American woman to do so.  She earned the nickname “America’s First Lady of the Air” after being the first woman to fly across the English Channel.  Unfortunately, she was killed a mere 11 months after receiving her pilot’s license while performing at the Third Annual Boston Aviation Meet.

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Harriet Quimby (May 11, 1875 – July 1, 1912)

She was the second woman in the world to receive a pilot’s license and the first American woman to do so.  She earned the nickname “America’s First Lady of the Air” after being the first woman to fly across the English Channel.  Unfortunately, she was killed a mere 11 months after receiving her pilot’s license while performing at the Third Annual Boston Aviation Meet.

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Sharing some love for a fellow Preston lass, Edith Rigby.I don’t have a photo and she’s damned impossible to find on Google, despite being such an all around awesome woman.
Edith was born in Preston in 1872 and set up home with her doctor husband Charles Rigby in prestigious Winckley Square, in the centre of Preston.From a young age, Edith was critical of the treatment of females in the lower classes. As a well-to-do Preston woman, she was well placed to help out the women and girls suffering in the cotton mills in the area, eventually setting up St Peter’s School in 1899. The school provided further education for girls, who were normally out of the system by the age of 11.Her home life was equally as forward thinking. The family’s servants did not have to wear uniforms and were permitted to eat in the dining hall, instead of being restricted to their own quarters out of sight of the rest of the household.In 1907, Edith formed the Preston branch of the Women’s Social and Political Union. She had officially become a Suffragette. And she was an absolute bad ass.She marched on the Houses of Parliament with fellow famous Suffragettes, Christabel and Sylvia Pankhurst, planted a bomb in the Liverpool Corn Exchange and was involved in several cases of arson. She was arrested and imprisoned seven times and was subjected to force-feeding when she, like many other Suffragettes behind bars, went on hunger strike.When she and fellow activists, including Sylvia, burnt down Lord Leverhulme’s bungalow in Rivington Pike, they caused over $100,000 worth of damage. Edith’a response when questioned about Leverhulme’s loss (which included many valuable pieces of art) was:

“I want to ask Sir William Lever whether he thinks his property on Rivington Pike is more valuable as one of his superfluous houses occasionally opened to people, or as a beacon lighted to King and Country to see here are some intolerable grievances for women.”

When World War One broke out, Edith became a driving force in the local war effort. She and her husband moved to Marigold Cottage, just outside Preston and, dressed in men’s clothes and with her hair cropped short, Edith grew fruit and vegetables, offering them as a contribution to the war effort. She and Charles adopted a son and remained in Marigold Cottage until Charles’ death in 1926, when she headed for Wales.
She died in 1948, near Llandudno.
What I found most amazing about Edith was that, in over ten years of education in Preston and after at least module on the Suffragettes and Suffragists, Edith was never mentioned to us. Hanging out with Sylvia and Christabel Pankhurst and setting up your own branch of WSPU is a big deal, whether you agree with their militant strategies or not. Starting your own school to vastly improve the lives of young girls across the city isn’t something to be sniffed at. It’s incredible that such a vibrant, interesting and strong local woman was ignored by the curriculum. I only found out about her when I discovered a book about Winckley Square published sometime in the 1980s in my nan’s house. I think I have a new project on my hands.
Edith’s Wikipedia page - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edith_Rigby

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Sharing some love for a fellow Preston lass, Edith Rigby.
I don’t have a photo and she’s damned impossible to find on Google, despite being such an all around awesome woman.

Edith was born in Preston in 1872 and set up home with her doctor husband Charles Rigby in prestigious Winckley Square, in the centre of Preston.
From a young age, Edith was critical of the treatment of females in the lower classes. As a well-to-do Preston woman, she was well placed to help out the women and girls suffering in the cotton mills in the area, eventually setting up St Peter’s School in 1899. The school provided further education for girls, who were normally out of the system by the age of 11.
Her home life was equally as forward thinking. The family’s servants did not have to wear uniforms and were permitted to eat in the dining hall, instead of being restricted to their own quarters out of sight of the rest of the household.
In 1907, Edith formed the Preston branch of the Women’s Social and Political Union. She had officially become a Suffragette. And she was an absolute bad ass.
She marched on the Houses of Parliament with fellow famous Suffragettes, Christabel and Sylvia Pankhurst, planted a bomb in the Liverpool Corn Exchange and was involved in several cases of arson. She was arrested and imprisoned seven times and was subjected to force-feeding when she, like many other Suffragettes behind bars, went on hunger strike.
When she and fellow activists, including Sylvia, burnt down Lord Leverhulme’s bungalow in Rivington Pike, they caused over $100,000 worth of damage. Edith’a response when questioned about Leverhulme’s loss (which included many valuable pieces of art) was:

“I want to ask Sir William Lever whether he thinks his property on Rivington Pike is more valuable as one of his superfluous houses occasionally opened to people, or as a beacon lighted to King and Country to see here are some intolerable grievances for women.”

When World War One broke out, Edith became a driving force in the local war effort. She and her husband moved to Marigold Cottage, just outside Preston and, dressed in men’s clothes and with her hair cropped short, Edith grew fruit and vegetables, offering them as a contribution to the war effort. She and Charles adopted a son and remained in Marigold Cottage until Charles’ death in 1926, when she headed for Wales.

She died in 1948, near Llandudno.

What I found most amazing about Edith was that, in over ten years of education in Preston and after at least module on the Suffragettes and Suffragists, Edith was never mentioned to us. Hanging out with Sylvia and Christabel Pankhurst and setting up your own branch of WSPU is a big deal, whether you agree with their militant strategies or not. Starting your own school to vastly improve the lives of young girls across the city isn’t something to be sniffed at. It’s incredible that such a vibrant, interesting and strong local woman was ignored by the curriculum. I only found out about her when I discovered a book about Winckley Square published sometime in the 1980s in my nan’s house. I think I have a new project on my hands.

Edith’s Wikipedia page - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edith_Rigby

commonrevolt:

New Acoustic - William Beckett: “Compromising Me”

(Source: commonrevolt)

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Emma Goldman, aka Red Emma
She was an anarchist known for her political activism, writing and speeches. She played a pivotal role in the development of anarchist political philosophy in North America and Europe in the first half of the twentieth century.

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Emma Goldman, aka Red Emma

She was an anarchist known for her political activism, writing and speeches. She played a pivotal role in the development of anarchist political philosophy in North America and Europe in the first half of the twentieth century.

Surfin on Life // Jzas Wlks via mookimooks.com

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Harriet Quimby (May 11, 1875 – July 1, 1912)
She was the second woman in the world to receive a pilot’s license and the first American woman to do so.  She earned the nickname “America’s First Lady of the Air” after being the first woman to fly across the English Channel.  Unfortunately, she was killed a mere 11 months after receiving her pilot’s license while performing at the Third Annual Boston Aviation Meet.

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Harriet Quimby (May 11, 1875 – July 1, 1912)

She was the second woman in the world to receive a pilot’s license and the first American woman to do so.  She earned the nickname “America’s First Lady of the Air” after being the first woman to fly across the English Channel.  Unfortunately, she was killed a mere 11 months after receiving her pilot’s license while performing at the Third Annual Boston Aviation Meet.

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Sharing some love for a fellow Preston lass, Edith Rigby.I don’t have a photo and she’s damned impossible to find on Google, despite being such an all around awesome woman.
Edith was born in Preston in 1872 and set up home with her doctor husband Charles Rigby in prestigious Winckley Square, in the centre of Preston.From a young age, Edith was critical of the treatment of females in the lower classes. As a well-to-do Preston woman, she was well placed to help out the women and girls suffering in the cotton mills in the area, eventually setting up St Peter’s School in 1899. The school provided further education for girls, who were normally out of the system by the age of 11.Her home life was equally as forward thinking. The family’s servants did not have to wear uniforms and were permitted to eat in the dining hall, instead of being restricted to their own quarters out of sight of the rest of the household.In 1907, Edith formed the Preston branch of the Women’s Social and Political Union. She had officially become a Suffragette. And she was an absolute bad ass.She marched on the Houses of Parliament with fellow famous Suffragettes, Christabel and Sylvia Pankhurst, planted a bomb in the Liverpool Corn Exchange and was involved in several cases of arson. She was arrested and imprisoned seven times and was subjected to force-feeding when she, like many other Suffragettes behind bars, went on hunger strike.When she and fellow activists, including Sylvia, burnt down Lord Leverhulme’s bungalow in Rivington Pike, they caused over $100,000 worth of damage. Edith’a response when questioned about Leverhulme’s loss (which included many valuable pieces of art) was:

“I want to ask Sir William Lever whether he thinks his property on Rivington Pike is more valuable as one of his superfluous houses occasionally opened to people, or as a beacon lighted to King and Country to see here are some intolerable grievances for women.”

When World War One broke out, Edith became a driving force in the local war effort. She and her husband moved to Marigold Cottage, just outside Preston and, dressed in men’s clothes and with her hair cropped short, Edith grew fruit and vegetables, offering them as a contribution to the war effort. She and Charles adopted a son and remained in Marigold Cottage until Charles’ death in 1926, when she headed for Wales.
She died in 1948, near Llandudno.
What I found most amazing about Edith was that, in over ten years of education in Preston and after at least module on the Suffragettes and Suffragists, Edith was never mentioned to us. Hanging out with Sylvia and Christabel Pankhurst and setting up your own branch of WSPU is a big deal, whether you agree with their militant strategies or not. Starting your own school to vastly improve the lives of young girls across the city isn’t something to be sniffed at. It’s incredible that such a vibrant, interesting and strong local woman was ignored by the curriculum. I only found out about her when I discovered a book about Winckley Square published sometime in the 1980s in my nan’s house. I think I have a new project on my hands.
Edith’s Wikipedia page - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edith_Rigby

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Sharing some love for a fellow Preston lass, Edith Rigby.
I don’t have a photo and she’s damned impossible to find on Google, despite being such an all around awesome woman.

Edith was born in Preston in 1872 and set up home with her doctor husband Charles Rigby in prestigious Winckley Square, in the centre of Preston.
From a young age, Edith was critical of the treatment of females in the lower classes. As a well-to-do Preston woman, she was well placed to help out the women and girls suffering in the cotton mills in the area, eventually setting up St Peter’s School in 1899. The school provided further education for girls, who were normally out of the system by the age of 11.
Her home life was equally as forward thinking. The family’s servants did not have to wear uniforms and were permitted to eat in the dining hall, instead of being restricted to their own quarters out of sight of the rest of the household.
In 1907, Edith formed the Preston branch of the Women’s Social and Political Union. She had officially become a Suffragette. And she was an absolute bad ass.
She marched on the Houses of Parliament with fellow famous Suffragettes, Christabel and Sylvia Pankhurst, planted a bomb in the Liverpool Corn Exchange and was involved in several cases of arson. She was arrested and imprisoned seven times and was subjected to force-feeding when she, like many other Suffragettes behind bars, went on hunger strike.
When she and fellow activists, including Sylvia, burnt down Lord Leverhulme’s bungalow in Rivington Pike, they caused over $100,000 worth of damage. Edith’a response when questioned about Leverhulme’s loss (which included many valuable pieces of art) was:

“I want to ask Sir William Lever whether he thinks his property on Rivington Pike is more valuable as one of his superfluous houses occasionally opened to people, or as a beacon lighted to King and Country to see here are some intolerable grievances for women.”

When World War One broke out, Edith became a driving force in the local war effort. She and her husband moved to Marigold Cottage, just outside Preston and, dressed in men’s clothes and with her hair cropped short, Edith grew fruit and vegetables, offering them as a contribution to the war effort. She and Charles adopted a son and remained in Marigold Cottage until Charles’ death in 1926, when she headed for Wales.

She died in 1948, near Llandudno.

What I found most amazing about Edith was that, in over ten years of education in Preston and after at least module on the Suffragettes and Suffragists, Edith was never mentioned to us. Hanging out with Sylvia and Christabel Pankhurst and setting up your own branch of WSPU is a big deal, whether you agree with their militant strategies or not. Starting your own school to vastly improve the lives of young girls across the city isn’t something to be sniffed at. It’s incredible that such a vibrant, interesting and strong local woman was ignored by the curriculum. I only found out about her when I discovered a book about Winckley Square published sometime in the 1980s in my nan’s house. I think I have a new project on my hands.

Edith’s Wikipedia page - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edith_Rigby

(Source: wildgrowers, via astr0travel)

commonrevolt:

New Acoustic - William Beckett: “Compromising Me”

(Source: commonrevolt)

(Source: valentinovamp)

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Emma Goldman, aka Red Emma
She was an anarchist known for her political activism, writing and speeches. She played a pivotal role in the development of anarchist political philosophy in North America and Europe in the first half of the twentieth century.

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Emma Goldman, aka Red Emma

She was an anarchist known for her political activism, writing and speeches. She played a pivotal role in the development of anarchist political philosophy in North America and Europe in the first half of the twentieth century.

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